How Heat Pumps Work

How do Heat Pumps Work

Air Source Heat Pumps look similar to air-conditioning units and are less disruptive to install than ground source heat pumps, as they do not require any digging in your garden. 

An ASHP works a bit like a refrigerator in reverse. The process consists of an evaporator, a compressor and a condenser. It absorbs heat from the outside air and the heat pump compressor then increases the temperature of that heat further to create useful heat.

Air-to-water systems take heat from the outside air and feed it into your wet central heating system. As the heat produced is cooler than that from a conventional boiler, you may need to install larger radiators or underfloor heating in your home to make the most of it.

Heat from the air is absorbed at low temperature into a fluid. This fluid then passes through a compressor where its temperature is increased, and transfers its higher temperature heat to the heating and hot water circuits of the house. 

Is an air source heat pump suitable for me?

To tell if an air source heat pump is right for you, there are a few key questions to consider:

Do you have somewhere to put it? You'll need a place outside your home where a unit can be fitted to a wall or placed on the ground. It will need plenty of space around it to get a good flow of air.

Is your home well insulated? Since air source heat pumps work best when producing heat at a lower temperature than traditional boilers, it's essential that your home is insulated and draught-proofed well for the heating system to be effective.

What fuel will you be replacing? The system will pay for itself much more quickly if it's replacing an electricity or coal heating system.

What type of heating system will you use? Air source heat pumps can perform better with underfloor heating system than with radiator-based systems because of the lower water temperatures required.

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